Wigle mobile rig for scanning odd Frequencies

The gear needed for wardriving

4 posts • Page 1 of 1
In my area on 5 GHz I find there are numerous links running in between the normal 5 GHz channels, such as 5800 MHz.
Normal Android phone scanning doesnt find these.

What can I use to scan all these frequencies and feed the data to Wigle in a mobile situation with GPS etc?
Those can be standard channels as well, maybe it's just your phone:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_W ... j/n/ac/ax)

Some manufacturers want to play safe and only support the minimal amount of channels, but many more had been opened in the recent years and even months. For best compatibility, I think laptops with replaceable internal wifi cards or a USB networking card would work the best that has soft MAC and up to date drivers supporting regulatory domains.
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Hi Kurz
Thats the problem, you cant use a phone to see these frequencies between normal channels that I am talking about because the phones only scan standard channels, like those listed in your link.
I am using a Mikrotik outdoor antenna and radio from home and it can be set up to look at 5 MHz steps which can see in between the standard channels. There are usually WiFi links on 5 GHz band people have set on non standard frequencies, presumably to avoid detection and minimise interference from other devices. I dont think its just my area that it occurs either, i have seen others.

So if there was a way I could take the data from a Mikrotik radio and feed that data into Wigle is really what I need to do, but I dont know how I can do this. I could get signal from external antenna on the car, then feed the Mikrotik. I would need a GPS in a laptop or other device too.

Leigh
Indeed, the wifi standard before 2012, allowed 802.11g to use so called "quarter- and half-clocked channels" (5MHz and 10MHz respectively). They carry multiple advantages, including improved noise immunity (delay spread due to up to 4x the symbol length), higher allowed transmit power (up to 2x due to power spectral density regulations) and less problems with exposed nodes and neighboring BSS's.

Many good chipsets and drivers still support it even for 802.11n, including Atheros on OpenWrt (they have their own debug patches to enable it). Too bad scanning, channel steering, channel raster allocation and neighbor coexistence would have been such a pain so they simply gave the whole thing up. I agree that it is quite useful for P2P links or to penetrate foliage.

Using such modes are not complying to the standard according to 802.11 (except for emergency response at certain frequencies), but they should still be legal according to the various ISM regulations in most countries.
I am using a Mikrotik outdoor antenna and radio from home and it can be set up to look at 5 MHz steps which can see in between the standard channels. There are usually WiFi links on 5 GHz band people have set on non standard frequencies, presumably to avoid detection and minimise interference from other devices. I dont think its just my area that it occurs either, i have seen others.

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